Welcome to Keira Knightley Fan,
an up-to-date and in-depth fan resource for the talented actress. Serving fans since 2004, we are now the longest running fansite dedicated to Keira. Nominated for two Academy Awards, Keira is recogised worldwide for her memorable big screen roles that include 'Pride & Prejudice', 'Atonement', 'The Imitation Game' and Disney's 'Pirates of the Caribbean' franchise. Our aim is to bring you all the latest news, articles, and photos relating to Keira's career, and strive to remain 100% gossip-and-paparazzi-free. Thank you for visiting!.
Quoting Keira
"All through my life what I've loved doing is watching movies. I love the escapism of film, I love stories. So it is incredible to be able to be in them as much as I am, to see them from the first stitch in a costume to the end product."
Keira Knightley on #MeToo, motherhood and Misbehaviour

FINANCIAL TIMES – Keira Knightley is a hypocrite. And so are you. “We’re all hypocrites,” she says. “We’re human beings. Being a human being is being a hypocrite.”

People, with all their messy contradictions, rarely live up to their virtuous ideals. That is how Knightley squares a successful career in an industry that projects impossible beauty standards — while also applauding the feminist protests at the 1970 Miss World competition, the subject of her new film, Misbehaviour.

Knightley plays Sally Alexander, the real-life activist who, together with fellow members of the new Women’s Liberation Movement, interrupted the pageant with ink-squirting toy guns, football rattles and flour bombs. Their actions brought the campaign against the objectification of women to a television audience of 100 million.

For Knightley, exploring conflicting interests — such as the challenge of balancing her own feminist principles with the demands of her job — was part of the film’s attraction. “That’s why I wanted to do it!” she says, with such force you can almost see the exclamation marks project from her mouth.

“I came into this completely on the side of the women’s libbers. Totally. Completely. Yes, 100 per cent, this is disgusting. And yet, I am somebody that makes my living, most of my money, from being a model [in campaigns for Chanel and others] and from doing red carpets.”

On the day we meet in a central London hotel, she is impeccably groomed in a Loewe black jacket, with smoky eye make-up and waved hair. There have been moments on the red carpet, she says, when she felt she was in “a dog show” with “f**king creepy cameras”.

Yet compromised principles are no excuse for inertia. “You’re going to find very few people like Greta Thunberg. [But] by going, ‘Oh God, therefore I can’t say anything’, then nothing is going to happen,” she says. “Nothing’s going to change in any direction whatsoever.”

Knightley may be best known for playing the romantic heroine in a slew of period dramas — from 2005’s Pride & Prejudice (which earned her an Oscar and Golden Globe nomination), to Atonement in 2007 (for which she was shortlisted for a Bafta and Golden Globe) and Anna Karenina in 2012. But it would be a mistake to pigeonhole her. She has increasingly embraced more complicated, unconventional roles.

Read More

Keira Covers PORTER

After last year’s hiatus following the birth of Delilah, Keira is now back in the spotlight for the promotion of Misbehaviour, gracing the cover of the March issue of PORTER. How gorgeous does she look? In addition to the new photoshoot, there’s an accompanying interview, which I have attached below. Enjoy!


PORTER – “What are you meant to aim for as a woman?” asks Keira Knightley, throwing up her hands imploringly. Rhetorical, yes, but the question underpins much of what we are here – in an east London café, the kind where the lighting is atmospheric enough that you might not spot a two-time Oscar nominee sitting in the corner – to discuss. Whether it’s the feminist narrative of her latest movie, the importance of championing female storytellers or raising two daughters, women are at the forefront of today’s conversation.

Growing up in the suburbs of south-west London with her actor father, playwright mother and older brother, equality was the norm for Knightley at home. “A lot of the time, my mum was earning more than my dad and that was never an issue,” she shrugs. “I mean, sometimes he earned more, sometimes she earned more. I was not raised to think that was anything other than normal.”

The 34-year-old actor – whose career took off stratospherically in her teenage years – found it a shock, then, “coming into the world where there are actually articles saying how much [my partner] earned and how much I earned, because it’s newsworthy that a woman could possibly earn more.”

Knightley married musician James Righton in 2013, and the couple welcomed their first daughter, Edie, in 2015, then Delilah was born last September. Still technically on maternity leave, she is delighted to note the absence of baby sick on her sweater today.

Read More

BBC Radio 5 Interview

In ‘Colette’, Keira Knightley Finds The “Utterly Inspiring” Female Character She’s Been Looking For

DEADLINE – After earning two Oscar nominations for period work—in Pride & Prejudice and The Imitation Game—Keira Knightley dons a corset once more for Colette, directed by Wash Westmoreland and written by Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Westmoreland, and his late husband Richard Glatzer. Knightley plays Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, a pillar of French literature whose husband greedily took credit for her own brilliant works in the early days of her career. And Colette tells a powerful story about female creativity as the film industry examines its own role in diminishing women’s voices.

What drew you to Colette? How did you get involved?

My agent sent me the script and I loved it. That was it, really. I knew a little bit of her writing, but I didn’t really know anything about her life, and definitely nothing about the first marriage. I was just sort of amazed that it was all true, and then spoke to Wash in a FaceTime conversation, as his phone was dying. He was in China, and I was in London, and after about 10 minutes, it was just perfectly obvious that he was great, and I really wanted to be a part of it. I think he’d been trying to make the film for about 17 years. He just knows the character inside out.

Did you see the parallels with today?

It amazed me how current it was, what it’s talking about with gender politics and sexual politics and feminism. It felt like it was everything that was being talked about at that point, and everything that I was interested in. I was really excited that you could take something that was 100 years ago, and yet it still feels so alive. Even the celebrity couple aspect of it, the fact that that was very much happening over 100 years ago, I find interesting. I’ve always loved history, making the past live and breathe again, and of course what you realize is that cultures change, but emotionally, as human beings, we don’t change that much. I think that you can make quite overt political points in period pieces where you don’t feel like you’re whacking somebody over the head with it. They can be subtle and hidden in a way that I really like.

What did Wash convey to you, early on, in terms of his take on Colette?

The main thing that we were talking about the whole time was just the span of time, and how we marked her becoming herself. At the beginning of the film, I think she’s about 19, and at the end of the film, she’s 34. So, we talked lot about what it feels like to physically become yourself, to be comfortable in your own skin, to find the person that you want to be. We actually used Coal Miner’s Daughter with Sissy Spacek as a reference because I thought she gave between about 13 and 40 in that. The physicality in that is just amazing, so he said, “Kind of do that, but much more subtle.” [Laughs] So, we stuck to that, again using the source material, the Claudines, as an inspiration. The wonderful thing about playing a writer is you literally have her words to go by.

Read More

Keira Knightley on family, feminism and freedom

Keira has been named as one of the Women of the Year by Harpers Bazaar UK, and features as one of the cover stars for the December issue of the magazine (two years after her last cover for the publication). As well as a stunning new photoshoot, there’s an interview with Keira where she discusses motherhood, feminism, and her role in Colette. The magazine is available on newsstands now.

HARPERS BAZAAR UK – You can see the panic in Keira Knightley’s eyes. This morning she has been trying to work out where to send her three-year-old daughter, Edie, to school next year, the kind of conundrum that to non-parents seems laughable and to parents becomes a sanity-devouring subject that has no happy ending.

There’s the local school, which she likes but her child might not get into, or the variety of private schools she’s not sure about, or home-schooling, which she would definitely never do. “And I’ve literally just gone crazy looking at every single one in London!” she says, laughing in the slightly possessed way of the deranged.

Knightley is sitting in an Islington café, not far from where she lives with her daughter and her musician husband, James Righton. The last time we met, five years ago, she was post-marriage, pre-baby. Back then, she’d just been in Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, a ‘piece of popcorn’ as she called it, and she was sweary and ferocious and funny. This time, she’s just put in a powerhouse performance in the title role in Colette and she’s still sweary and ferocious and funny, but slightly unravelled by three long years of destroyed nights.

Life has changed. The films are a little different, and she’s had approximately 100 per cent less sleep. It got to the point, she says, “where it’s like, “Oh, nobody is sleeping in this house”, and you think, “Do we all hate each other, or are we actually completely sleep-deprived?””

While pregnant, she took a year off work. Then she had her daughter and with a four-month-old in tow, the family moved to New York so that Knightley could perform the title role in Thérèse Raquin on Broadway. “I actually don’t know how we did that,” she says, still looking bemused by the decision. “If we have another one I wouldn’t say I’d do that again. It was quite mad.” She remembers little of the time – the eight three-hour shows a week while breastfeeding an infant blurring into a haze. It was only possible at all by hiring a maternity nurse at night, who Knightley paid double what she was earning in the show so that she could rest in order to play the psychotic and murderous Thérèse again the next day. At least, she says, the storm of new-mother hormones and overspilling emotions proved helpful for the role.

Read More

Keira Knightley looks to ‘Colette’ for courage in the battle against her own self-doubt

LOS ANGELES TIMES – At first, Keira Knightley thought everything was going to be fine.

Her pregnancy had been delightful, so she’d give birth to her first child and then continue working at her normal pace. A Broadway show and two films in a year? Try her.

But after Knightley had her daughter, Edie, things didn’t go according to plan. She was hormonal, for one. And tired. Because Edie never seemed to sleep.

Still, she intended to keep her obligations. She performed eight times a week in a stage production of “Thérèse Raquin” and then filmed a supporting role in the drama “Collateral Beauty.”

But in the summer of 2016, staring down the lead role in the period drama “Colette,” Knightley decided she needed a break.

“I was like, ‘I can’t. I literally can’t,’ ” the actress said. “I am so tired. I am so hormonal. I can’t deal with this big character right now. So they very sweetly said, ‘We’ll put it off for a year.’ ”

Director Wash Westmoreland wasn’t exactly thrilled to push the start date on “Colette” — “no one welcomes that news,” he said — but with the well-reviewed film set to open in theaters Friday, that delay ended up being “the best thing that ever happened.”

The filmmaker was able to spend the year finessing the script about the renowned French novelist, who initially wrote under her husband’s name until her work became so successful in the early 1900s that she fought for recognition.

Read More

Keira Knightley Would Love to Play Florence Nightingale

VARIETY – Filmmaker Wash Westmoreland, and actresses Keira Knightley and Denise Gough dropped by the Variety Studio presented by AT&T at the Toronto Film Festival to discuss their new movie, “Colette,” which tells the story of French novelist Gabrielle Colette.

Westmoreland co-wrote the film with his late partner, Richard Glatzer, who he had previously written and directed all his movies with, including “Still Alice,” which won Julianne Moore the Oscar for best actress. The pair had wanted to make “Colette” for years and before Glatzer passed away from complications due to ALS in March 2015, he hoped it would be their next project.

“He got to see Julianne win the Academy Award when he was in the ICU in the hospital,” Westmoreland revealed. “We knew we had a chance now, we had a springboard into our next film. And I said, ‘What is it to be?’ At the time, he was just typing with his toe and he typed ‘Colette’ on his machine. And two weeks later, he passed away. But I knew what I had to do and set about doing it.”

Westmoreland said his first solo directing effort proved to be emotional. “It was difficult because Richard and I had worked so closely for so many years. We knew each other so well, having written together, worked together, slept together, done everything together for so long that part of my mind is Richard, and sometimes when I would be faced with a difficult problem, I would ask: ‘What would Richard say?’ And the answer would be there.” Westmoreland added that in many ways, he considers Glatzer a co-director on the film.

Knightley has played a number of dynamic women in her career, and noted that portraying Colette was empowering. “I was like, ‘Oh, I like walking in your shoes, this is great. I walk tall.’”

When Knightley and Gough were asked about other powerful women they would like to portray, Gough joked, “I would like to play Keira Knightley in the story of her life.”

Knightley added that she’d be interested in the stories of Josephine Bonaparte and Florence Nightingale. Gough said, “I think we could always do with another Joan of Arc. You can never get enough Joan.”

Gough then revealed that she has a personal connection to a historical woman ripe for a biopic. “I’m also a direct descendant of the first-ever female pirate, Grace O’Malley,” she said. “The first-ever female pirate was an Irish woman who led ships full of men.”

1 2 3 7